Strategies For Managing Change – The Excellent Case For Creating Your Own Culture Maturity Model

Maturity models are usually associated with projects and programmes. However, I want to make the case for developing your own culture maturity model as a preparation to the development of your own strategies for managing change.I first became aware of the significance and importance of organisational culture in 1994 when I was involved in a business development exercise with a colleague and the significance of organisational culture – initially seen solely from a business development perspective – became firmly established on our radar.We rapidly made 5 discoveries:(1) That we can construct a simple matrix that can enable us to very rapidly identify the type of organisational culture we are dealing with.The basic structure of the matrix can be used to define a template of an organisational culture, namely:- Type of culture
– A summary definition of the culture
– Evidence of the culture – i.e. its characteristics
– Key issues faced and addressed by that culture as can be seen in actions and behaviours
– The areas of major focus – or key areas of impact – of the culture

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(2) That these cultures are obvious and instantly recognisable and indisputable from the company’s own perspective [i.e. they recognise themselves as such](3) That these cultures as seen from a business development perspective form a maturity model. In other words, organisations migrate along a clearly identifiable and predictable path as their own business development skills evolved(4) That the structured template of this cultural matrix is universal and transcends our original business development perspective -i.e. you can use this template to define ANY organisational culture(5) That any organisation has more than one culture and that we are able to define a subset of characteristics of the likely orientation of these sub cultures in relation to the primary or dominant organisational cultureThis template has been used on many companies and in many, many different situations over the years – overtly [with client involvement] and covertly [i.e. I use it but don’t involve my client as it may not be relevant or they may not be receptive.]My definition of a generic maturity modelFollowing this I formulated my own definition of a generic maturity model:”A maturity model [usually represented as a schematic] is a structured description that shows the stages of evolution of an organisation in transition through various developmental states. It is pre-supposed that this evolution represents progress to more developed or advanced states of learning, insight, understanding and practise.”Having established a cultural template of where your organisation is now, you can determine the template of how your organisation will look after your step change initiative and clearly see the gaps between these positions.

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Navigating through the issues to where you want to beThis, in turn, enables you to determine a route that will navigate you through the issues that will arise – and especially to help you identify the full impacts of the changes on those people who will be most affected and to plan accordingly.And in conclusion – the reason why using a cultural maturity map to understand your cultures is so important is that they are the single biggest determinant of how people in your organisation will behave – and especially in the context of a step change – and thus determine the success or failure of your initiative.Properly applied in a change management context, this will provide you with an excellent pre-programme planning analysis process that will provide the input to the preparation and delivery of an executable [holistic and wide view perspective] programme based approach to change management.